Using Twitter in School

I’m preparing for an in-school training session on Twitter and Blogs.  I’ve found lots of great examples of how these are being used by schools, teachers and classes.  I’ll be blogging about these soon but thought this post that I first wrote for the Northern Grid website would be useful to share.

Who are the most influential tweeters in eLearning? Simfin is one!

Friday, 25 March 2011 15:47
Northern Grid has been using Twitter for over two years and it has proved to be enormously beneficial. The obvious way we use it is to get messages out about our services and events but that’s only part of the story, and the least important part. Twitter is about connecting people, having a conversation, sharing interesting news and finding out what people think.At the simplest level it can be used for sharing the unimportant minutiae of people’s daily lives but follow the right people and you get enormous insight into the key issues of the day. It takes time to build up a list of key people and not everything you read will be of interest to you, but it is worth the effort.Don’t worry if you’re not sure what you should say on Twitter, lots of its users are interested ‘lurkers’ people who benefit from contributions from others but say very little themselves. There’s nothing wrong with that and for a lot of people a lack of time means this is all they can do, they dip in and out taking what is relevant to them. But fortunately some people do more, they share their knowledge and experiences, they use Twitter to research and share their findings, they ask for and provide support and much, much more.Since we started using Twitter we have made contact with many enthusiastic, committed and outstanding practioners. We have learned a lot from them and want others to benefit too. That’s why we’ve invited so many of them to present at this year’s Northern Grid conference.So how do you decide who to follow? Start with people you know and respect: people who have similar interests to your own. Then look to see who they follow, check out those people’s twitter streams and see if they are sharing things you’re interested in, if they are add them to your list. Over time you’ll find out who are the most interesting people you follow and through them you’ll find others.

Another starting point would be to look at this list:

The Top 20 most influential tweeters in eLearning, training and HR

http://nowcomms.com/newsbank/webucationtweeter_result.htm

These are people that are well respected and known for sharing valuable resources or ideas and it’s great to see our very own eLearning Officer Simon Finch (@simfin) at number 15. This achievement recognises that Simon is one of those key people who does much more than lurk.

Also on the list are Professor Steve Wheeler (@timbuckteeth) at number 5 and Doug Belshaw (@dajbelshaw) at number 16. Both will be at our conference in June.This list was generated after asking 500 people to nominate just one tweeter worth following, if you ask different people you’ll get a different list. Everyone needs to build their own contacts and make the list of people they follow relevant to them. This list isn’t a bad place to start though.

You may want to follow

@northerngrid – that’s us

@the_nen – the National Education Network

@the_lpn – the Learning Platform Network

@simfin – the ‘influential’ Simon Finch

@jackcl – more of a lurker, Christine Jack

For more information

Twitter

Simon’s blog entry on using Twitter

Twitter – share ideas and knowledge Or How to Have a Positive Twitter Experience

http://simfin.wordpress.com/more/twitter/

Those Who Can Tweet – TES article 25/3/11 includes more useful people to follow

http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6074409

Twitter for Twitchy Teachers by @esafetyadviser

http://esafety-adviser.com/twitchy_twitter

 

About jackcl

E learning consultant in the North East interested in teaching and learning, innovation and new technologies
This entry was posted in Learning, Social Media in Schools and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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